The Big Move!

For those interested in following my future posts, you’ll need to follow me to our new website. Yes, it’s true… we got our domain registered and have started a real site. Just follow us on over and you’ll be able to keep up with the latest posts on editing and grammar. You’ll also be able to contact us regarding your manuscripts and other editing you need done.

 

The Unbridled Editor

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Why Copy Edit?

Copy editing will improve any manuscript. It improves the writing, it improves the writer’s own understanding of the structure of their book, and it makes it easier to publish the book. I know it is difficult to hand your masterpiece off to someone else and let them have their way with it. Before you go into a panic attack, there are a few things to point out.

A good editor will never just slash at your manuscript willy nilly. Certain changes for grammar, style and spelling may be automatic, but anything structural will be suggested first. Perhaps the editor will query you on a potential change or ask why you set it up in the order that it is in. These suggestions can not only tighten your writing, but improve the entire structure of your story.

What was that about making your story easier to publish? Well, like everyone else in this economy, publishers are being hit hard. They understand the reasoning for a high quality edit of every manuscript they set in print. But with costs being what they are, they may be more inclined to print a manuscript that has already had a lot of the editing done before they get it than one they need to spend a lot of time and money on to get it ready. In fact, many agents won’t even consider a book these days unless it is already polished and ready to go.

Yes, it’s true that writers can do editing themselves… to a point. You can go through it with a fine tooth comb and correct your spelling errors. However, and this is true of all writers, myself included, that after awhile, you just don’t see the errors. This is actually good if you’re a writer. You need to be so involved in your work that it becomes a part of you. But this is also why you need a fresh pair of eyes that are not attached to the material to really do a good edit for you.

So, you’ve decided to hand your manuscript off to Aunt Marge. She was a school librarian… she should be able to edit your book, right? Well, she may catch a few things, but professional editors are skilled in evaluating every sentence; every word. They know how to pay attention to detail as well as understand the structure of a book. They also understand how the publishing world works and how to help your book become more marketable. And finally, the best thing you get from a good editor is someone who can teach you. They won’t lecture you about how this, that and the other thing is all wrong; they will guide you and suggest how you can best improve your book.

Just remember that it is a collaboration. The editor is there to make you the best you can be; you will benefit as much as your book.

Why Do I Edit?

I have been asked why I wanted to be an editor occasionally over the years. The truth is… I can’t help it. I unconsciously edit everything I read. My family will tell you my outrage when I find an error in a book we’ve purchased. I point out errors in signs, handouts and menus. I can’t help it. I’ve always been this way.

I’m nice enough not to point out these errors to the parties involved, but it irks me to no end. When I was in high school, I used to correct the handouts I got from my creative writing teacher and hand them back to him. When I graduated, I gave him a special gift: his own personal spelling dictionary. LOL

So, how could I be anything else than an editor? Yes, I write. Yes, I draw and paint. But deepest down, in my heart of hearts, I am an editor.

So, take the opportunity to have me in your corner. I am happy to work on your manuscripts and get them ship shape.

Special “I Need My Car Fixed” Critique Sale!

We’ve all had those times in our lives. You’re driving happily down the street and suddenly something just isn’t right with the car. Well, we had one yesterday. Our car needs to visit the car hospital in a very bad way. So, to raise funds to pay for our car’s hospital bill, I’m offering an “I Need My Car Fixed” special.

For $25, I will do a critique of your manuscript and edit a sample chapter. This means I will read the entire manuscript so I see the whole picture. I will point out areas that need work due to organization, plot development, etc. I will line edit an entire chapter sentence by sentence so you can see your own weak points in your writing (we all have them). It is possible that you can go on to edit the rest of your manuscript yourself after this because you know what to look for.You will get your manuscript with the edits on the first chapter and a report from me on my suggestions.

For $50, I will critique your manuscript and line edit the first four chapters. This will give you an even better idea on what you can do with the rest of your manuscript editorially. Again you will get all the edits and a full report on my suggestions for the rest of the manuscript.

For $100, I will critique and line edit half the manuscript. Same deal as the previous arrangements.

For $150, I will critique and line edit the entire manuscript. Same deal as the previous arrangements.

This is a limited time offer; you can look at my rate sheet and see what a good deal this is. If you want to take advantage of this deal, you must do so before November 5!

If you have friends who write, please share this deal with them. It can set them on the right track before they begin submitting to agents and publishers.

Thanks! And my car thanks you, too!

Peek, Peak & Pique

Have you ever had your curiosity piqued? Have you climbed a peak? Have you taken a peek at something new? Yes, these three words sound alike, but they are totally different.

Pique

Pique is a French word that means “prick” or “stimulate.” Your curiosity can be piqued, but not peaked. So can your interest. Pique can also mean resentment or annoyance.

The new book piqued my interest.

The model had a fit of pique when they didn’t have her favorite snack.

Peak

A peak is the top of something; the peak of a mountain, the peak of a career, the peak of an experience.

The mountain peaks looked rosy in the sunset.

Peek

We’ve all taken a peek at something. It is a quick, furtive look where we hope we won’t get caught, usually.

It was difficult not to peek in the oven at the souffle.

Are, Our, Hour

Do you know anyone who mixes these words up when they write? They usually know what they want to say, but when it comes to writing it down, many people find it easy to mix up are, our and hour.

Are & Our

Lots of people pronounce our like are when they talk, so when they write, they don’t think about it. In order to have our written words taken seriously, however, you need to know the difference.

Our & Hour

For those people who pronounce these two words alike, spelling can also interfere when they write.

Are

Are is a plural verb or helping verb.

The flowers are in full bloom.

Our

Our is a possessive pronoun.

Our house is blue and white.

Hour

Hour refers to a period of sixty minutes.

The hour passed slowly.

Are We Allowed to Read Aloud?

This is a pair of words that I normally think are pretty self-explanatory… yet I continually see them misused. Allowed or Aloud? What do you think?

Allowed

Allowed means you have permission to do something.

The children are allowed to play with the dog.

Aloud

Aloud means something can be heard.

She spoke aloud without realizing it.

Simple, right? Right! 🙂

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